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“A Study in Blues Piano” Course Coupon (starts now, offer expires 3/31/2018)

BLUES ALERT — PLEASE SHARE THIS!

Coupon Expires March 31, 2018: Here’s a handy dandy discount coupon for my “A Study in Blues Piano” on Udemy: Lifetime access for just $12.99. (List price is $29.99.)

The Course at $12.99 (coupon is automatic)

or use coupon code 88KENT when purchasing.

Please share this with your musical friends!

Expires March 31, 2018 so act now! 

 

MISSED THE SALE WINDOW?

If you miss the coupon window, the course can be accessed using the link below. Sometimes Udemy sets their own temporary discounts, so you could get lucky!

The course at regular price ($29.99)

 

Openings Now for 5 or 6 Piano Students (Private Lessons)

Hi folks, I have new slots for five or six students, in or near Huntington Beach, California.

I’m offering lessons in Jazz, Blues, Rock, Pop, Folk, etc., piano or keyboards.  Sorry, no slots are currently open for classical piano, although if you want to learn to read music as part of your “pop” studies, we can do that.

Levels taught: Beginner, intermediate, advanced.

Lessons are 45-minutes, once per week.  In-home lessons are available.

Please call:

714.519.9920

for more information!

 

The notes to “Für Elise” on piano (by Beethoven, officially titled “Bagatelle in A minor”)

Annotated sheet music, plus a video

Below is a printable page of Fur Elise piano sheet music, which I’ve marked up for you, to include each note’s letter name (E, A, B, D#, etc.) .  I’ve used this method with many of my early piano students, allowing them to start playing great sounding pieces that are well beyond their current reading level. This approach is best for people with a general idea of how piano notation works, but who are weak on associating all those lines and spaces with the keys on the piano.

Note, this sheet music covers only the famous first section of the piece, the part most people have heard.

I left out various markings such as dynamics, crescendos, phrase markings, and pedal markings. This is so the inexperienced music reader can focus strictly on the keys to be played. The WAY they are played, and the RHYTHM in which they are played, can be gathered by listening to a good recording of Fur Elise, and/or by looking at the standard notation.  Regardless, I guess it almost goes without saying, the ideal way for an early/intermediate piano student to learn this piece is with a professional piano teacher, although not all people have that luxury!

Side laugh: I once had a young student who thought for a while that I was saying “Furry Lease” as the title. So cute!

Below that is a “slow-motion” video, showing the first section only (this is not a performance, just an audio/visual reference video, demonstrating  the notes played in order).

Für Elise Sheet with Note Names

Reference Video of Für Elise Notes

 

Beethoven’s Für Elise – Slow-motion video for reference

Here’s a slow-motion demonstration of the notes to Beethoven’s Für Elise.  Shown here is the most well-known first section of the piece.

This is not a performance video.  Meaning, you can’t take cues from this video on the phrasing, dynamics, tempo, pedaling, etc.  However, many people find it useful to have a reference like this, especially those who play by ear, and are simply trying to acquire the notes.

 

 

A Good Way to Learn All Your “Thirteenth” Chords (by Pattern, NOT by Rote)

Hello again, piano people!

Todays’ post is about learning “thirteenth chords” on piano. In this video, you will learn a good way to learn and retain all twelve of the standard 13th chords without resorting to rote memorization.  In my experience,  I discovered early on that learning scales and chords by rote — that is, note-by-note, without any understanding of the patterns they all have in common — is the worst way to go.  Learning the underlying patterns that consistently define all scales and chords is absolutely where it’s at!

 

Honky Tonk

 

via Daily Prompt: Honk

So I’m responding to a blogging “prompt” here on WordPress.com. The prompt for today is “Honk.”

Honk…Honky-tonk…Honky-tonk piano!  I knew I would get to the piano sooner or later.  In this case, two degrees of separation.  Musically speaking, two half-steps?

Since my blog is mostly for piano players, here’s something I composed for piano a few years back, while thinking of a honky-tonk in the Old West.  I didn’t actually have time to learn the piece, so I just wrote it down and then created a MIDI file from that.  This video is just an audio capture of the MIDI file being played back on my PC.  In other words, I did not physically perform this version. Give credit to robots when credit is due.

Doc Holliday’s Waltz

via Daily Prompt: Honk

More on “Fourth Chords”

Ain’t life grand? As in grand piano?

Here’s a follow up to my recent post about “Fourth Chords.” I made this second video to give more insight regarding how “fourth chord” shapes can be superimposed over various roots, to create refreshing voicings for standard chord types, such as major, minor and dominant seventh chords.  The goal here is to focus on the practical side of putting these shapes into use!

Video: Fourth Chords, Part Two

“Fourth Chords” — Very Useful (Part One)

“Fourth chords” are chords built as a “stack of fourths,” rather than as a “stack of thirds.”An example of a “stack of fourths” would be: D, G, C, and F, where D is the lowest pitch, and the rest make up a series of fourths above that.

The greatest thing about these stacks is that any given stack can be superimposed above multiple roots, to create a variety of voicings for various chord types.

Using the stack mentioned above as an example:

A “Dmin7” chord using the stack D, G, C, and F, results in a nice open-sounding voicing, with an added 11th (the “G” note is the 11th).

OR,

D, G, C and F also sounds great over a B-flat root, creating a “Bb69” sound! That is, a B-flat major chord, with an added 6th and 9th. (G is the 6th, and C is the 9th).

And so on…my video here explains this in depth. (Check back soon for Part Two, with more insights on this.)

Learn a 12-Bar Intro for Blues — Plus the Start of a Solo

Hey Blues people!  Wassup from the OG (Old Guy). Let me show you this nice 12-bar opening, to get your jam started. I’ve also included something to get your improv going after the intro.

Essential Theory: Fourths and Fifths

NOTE: Website pianodrumteacher.com, mentioned in the video, is my older site, soon to be retired.

DESCRIPTION OF THIS VIDEO:
Piano and Music Theory – FOURTHS and FIFTHS – “Perfect and Not-so-perfect.” Essential knowledge for building chords without rote memorization, and for understanding chord progressions, plus understanding general music theory.